Being Prepared

Economic and Mark of the Beast
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby Sherree on Sun Dec 21, 2008 7:07 am

WOW, Daff, and to think that I was just wanting a root cellar! Man, that would be awesome to have an underground living space! Probably would be able to build a small fire without being noticed!

Maybe I'm sounding an alarm about something that may not come to pass. He may realize that this just wouldn't be feasible. Too many folks depend on fire for heat ( fireplaces, wood heaters, etc) All this nonsense about carbon credits and special taxes, environmental crimes may cause everyone to have to pay fines and higher taxes if they continue to use these things. Anyway, I was just thinking about the possibility.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby daffodyllady on Sun Dec 21, 2008 1:57 pm

Something that greatly intrigues me, is the masonry stove. Basically, it is a brick stove built into the bottom of a chimney, and the flue winds back and forth thru the chimney. So, you build a very hot fire with the damper all the way open. You can use very small trashy wood for the fire. You dont have to make a huge fire. All you need to do is to heat the stones of the massive chimney whenever they feel cool. Then let the fire go out. The stones of the warm chimney will radiate heat for up to several days. When you make a very hot fire, the wood doesnt get translated into smoke. It goes into heat instead. So, you have a fire that is difficult to detect by sight, and one that uses very little fuel.

Here is a link to get you started: http://www.grannysstore.com/Do-It-Yours ... stoves.htm

Masonry stoves are designed to burn a hot fire, with the air supply and chimney damper wide open. This results in a clean burn, with little visible smoke. The distinctive feature of the heaters is a series of baffles to pull the heat out of the exhaust. The masonry absorbs the heat of the fire, then radiates it gradually back into the room.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby Sherree on Sun Dec 21, 2008 2:52 pm

Thanks a bunch for the info! I will have Cary take a look at the link. We really do want to have a fireplace built, but there is a lack of funds right now. All we have is one gas heater that heats the whole house. Trying to get away from being dependent on gas. Wood is cheaper when you have a lot of it yourself. That is, if we don't have to pay extremely high taxes to burn it!!!
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby CaryC on Tue Dec 23, 2008 8:43 am

Hey,


Seriously... I have been wondering if I should build an underground cabin back on the mountain behind my house...


You're making me green with envy :mrgreen: . "A mountain in my back yard" yada, yada, "build a cabin" yada, yada. Man that sounds like so much fun, I can't stand it. I was looking at some stuff in reference to "Alone in the Wilderness" a TV show on the ed. channel about this guy who in 1968 left his job and went to Alaska, built a cabin and etc..... Had a mountain in his back yard, etc.... and was sitting around here daydreaming. I'm like, what are you waiting for, go for it.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby iamkk7ue on Tue Dec 23, 2008 8:55 pm

CaryC wrote:Hey, I'm like, what are you waiting for, go for it.


If they are anything like us here, funds is the sticking point. Another hangup would be the permit process. Even if it went lightning fast with no hitches, there would be a paper trail of its existence. So that means doing it clandestinely. Which Im all for, but not sure if something of that magnitude could be done, unnoticed. Not that I havent considered such an underground lair here..... :mrgreen:
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby CaryC on Wed Dec 24, 2008 6:59 am

Hey,

Money, that's our problem too. Can't live without it, can't shoot it. I would love to take off and live like that guy in Alaska, unfortunately I like living, breathing, eating etc....and I fear if I was to take off, I'd be dead in about 3 weeks.

Even though my daughter-in-law harvested a 6 point buck with a 15 1/2 inch spread and weighting 175 lbs (big for here) day before yesterday, and my son,her husband got a doe yesterday. Thinking about moving in with them.

Merry Christmas to all, and to all a good night.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby CaryC on Tue Dec 30, 2008 1:49 pm

Hey,

Well, I have just got to congratulate everyone, at least those in this thread so: Congratulations Everyone !!!

What over you say.

Well, for being ahead of the curve of course. I was reading in the July/Aug Audobon magazine today where they interviewed this guy who was either in England or New England, and was planning on living on foraging for a year. No planting and no hunting just foraging. The purpose was to call attention to how much food was all around us, and for folks to start eating it. I was like duh! Audobon thought it was exciting. I though--I know a bunch of people who are foraging like in--eating nuts, wild acorns/pecans/walnuts--wild fruit--huckleberries, blackberries, dew berries, muscadine--a few veggies' like garlic/onions/dandelion. So you guys are way ahead, you might even say futuristic.

I know we aren't into total forage, but we got some going on anyway, whereas other don't.

And we aren't dong one thing this guy is doing----eating road kill. Just hasn't got a clue on how bad bruised meat is.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby SueAnn on Tue Dec 30, 2008 8:29 pm

I have a question about storing rice. Forgive me if this was already asked/answered. I do not have the time to go through this entire thread.

I bought my first big bag of rice. I don't know how many pounds it is, but it fits in a plastic grocery bag by itself and I can't easily lift it. I have never bought such a big bag before.

It is currently in a regular plastic bag. Not very sturdy. What is the best way to store it long term?
What kind of container and what kind of temperature, etc.
I plan on getting more in the future.
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وَقَالَ الرَّبُّ لأَبْرَامَ: «اتْرُكْ أَرْضَكَ وَعَشِيرَتَكَ وَبَيْتَ أَبِيكَ وَاذْهَبْ إِلَى الأَرْضِ الَّتِي أُرِيكَ،
فَأَجْعَلَ مِنْكَ أُمَّةً كَبِيرَةً وَأُبَارِكَكَ وَأُعَظِّمَ اسْمَكَ، وَتَكُونَ بَرَكَةً (لِكَثِيرِينَ).
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby aaron on Tue Dec 30, 2008 8:40 pm

How long are you going to store it? I'm no expert, but the rice we buy in 15 lb. bags we put in gallon plastic storage containers that have a sealing lid. You have to keep it dry. Our rice has held up fine like this so far, and we've been eating it sometimes. If nothing else, you could keep things like that in a plastic tote with a lid to protect it from water and small varmints.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby SueAnn on Tue Dec 30, 2008 8:45 pm

aaron wrote:How long are you going to store it? I'm no expert, but the rice we buy in 15 lb. bags we put in gallon plastic storage containers that have a sealing lid. You have to keep it dry. Our rice has held up fine like this so far, and we've been eating it sometimes. If nothing else, you could keep things like that in a plastic tote with a lid to protect it from water and small varmints.


aaron, this is desperation food. This is real rice. I have never bought it before. I have used instant rice all my life. So, the chances of eatting it before we are starving to death are limited. For some reason I did not think storing it in plastic would be a good idea, that's why I asked. <sigh> as you can see my "survival" knowledge leaves a lot to be desired.
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وَقَالَ الرَّبُّ لأَبْرَامَ: «اتْرُكْ أَرْضَكَ وَعَشِيرَتَكَ وَبَيْتَ أَبِيكَ وَاذْهَبْ إِلَى الأَرْضِ الَّتِي أُرِيكَ،
فَأَجْعَلَ مِنْكَ أُمَّةً كَبِيرَةً وَأُبَارِكَكَ وَأُعَظِّمَ اسْمَكَ، وَتَكُونَ بَرَكَةً (لِكَثِيرِينَ).
َأُبَارِكُ مُبَارِكِيكَ وَأَلْعَنُ لاعِنِيكَ، وَتَتَبَارَكُ فِيكَ جَمِيعُ أُمَمِ الأَرْضِ »
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby daffodyllady on Tue Dec 30, 2008 10:52 pm

I would freeze the rice first, to prevent infestation.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby CaryC on Wed Dec 31, 2008 8:21 am

Hey SueAnn,

For long term storage--years--it is recommended to transfer the rice into a "mylar" bag, with some O2 absorbers, and then all of that in a plastic bucket, with a sealable, gasket lid.

Below is a link to one place for mylar bags, O2 absorbers, and a how-to video. I'm sure they have the buckets too.

http://www.frugalsquirrels.com/store/fo ... _bags.html

Just a suggestion, and you can take it for what's worth: Whatever your cost was for the big bag of rice, I would suggest buying a smaller bag of rice, some dry beans (of any sort you like), and some spam (they make a variety now) for about the same price. You can let that sit in your cabinet until you have enough to fill a bucket, then transfer. I'm just thinking this way you/we would be storing meals, and not just food. 'Course everyone has their own method and that's fine too.

It's no problem asking questions, I understand about not wanting to go back 7 pages and looking through all this. If you have some more ask away.

Hope that helps.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby CaryC on Wed Dec 31, 2008 8:28 am

Hey SueAnn,

Just had another thought:

You might want to practice cooking with real rice. It's a totally different thing. You can buy a small bag with instant rice for a backup and give it a shot. 'Course you could always get in a lot of practice by cooking it over an open fire, cast iron pot with a triod. :lol:
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby iamkk7ue on Sat Jan 03, 2009 10:02 pm

Im going to try using seal a meal bags to portion the rice, beans, etc into managable quantities then store them in old ammo cans. These cans have a gasketed lid and are rather tough. That way a substantial quantity could be easily loaded for transport if needed and since the cans are steel, less likely to suffer critter intrusion. Thats my plan, I just have to get off my duff and 'git er done'.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby FamilyMan on Wed Jan 07, 2009 1:50 pm

For anyone who is interested. Here is the U.S. Army survival manual. It has chapters on first aid, what plants are edible. What plants have medicinal properties. How to catch fish, how to trap, how to make shelters, obtaining and purifying water, fire starting, etc. Could be a handy thing to have around. I printed a hard copy to keep in my emergency kit. RIGHT CLICK HERE and select "Save As" to Download.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby CaryC on Thu Jan 08, 2009 3:13 pm

Hey Familyman,

Just wanted to say thanks, didn't know that thing was online.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby FamilyMan on Fri Jan 09, 2009 7:26 am

CaryC wrote:Hey Familyman,

Just wanted to say thanks, didn't know that thing was online.


You're welcome. Something like that could be real handy in an emergency.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby CaryC on Sat Jan 10, 2009 10:11 am

Hey Familyman,

You sure are right about that. I've got a hard copy, and keep it with our camping gear. They when we go on day hikes I pack it in the butte pack/backpack just in case. So far it just been extra weight, thank the Lord for that, but you never know.

If anyone is interested you can still get them from Amazon.com.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby Bug on Thu Jan 15, 2009 9:01 pm

Rice needs to have the oxygen removed for long tem storage. Like wheat or wheat berries, the a bug is in it. Noodles also have to have air removed. Vacuume packing it in bags or jars works well if you have a Seal a Meal type thing. Wal-mart carries them and so does Amazon.

Sugar and salt can be put in zip bags. With all things in a bag, you have to put in keepers to keep mice and such out. Glass jars serve both purposes and when the jars are empty, you can can garden stuff in them or refill. The adapter to vacuum jar lids down is also available on Amazon. Hope this helps.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby imirish01 on Mon Jan 19, 2009 6:30 pm

CaryC-

Pecans and walnuts would be great as well. You don't have to toast them if you are putting them in the rice to cook, but if you put them in a rice salad, go ahead and toast them. It will add to the flavor. The berries you mentioned would be great for a cold salad. Persimmons? had not thought about. Basically because they freak me out being all slimy and such....

Don't' forget, there are several types of rice as well-- Jasmine, long grain, short grain( for risotto), basmati(sp)- geeze, that's all that's coming to me at the moment. Anyway, I just mentioned it so you know you can add variaty to your cooking.

Info only---this post is a carry over from another thread. CaryC had a question and I decided to answere here. :grin:
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby CaryC on Tue Jan 20, 2009 8:07 am

Hey,

Thanks imirish01. And yea, folks, I was about to high jack another thread in the "Whatever" forum under something like "our own chef" which is iamthewalrus and imirish01 was gracious enough to answer me.

Thanks again for the info and ideas on how to dress up rice and beans.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby CaryC on Tue Jan 27, 2009 7:01 am

Hey,

Just a reminder to everyone that Feb. is the month to prune fruit, and nut trees. Also the time to prune those dogwoods.

I also went out and checked on those Black Walnuts we had gathered and then spread out by the fence, so they would self clean. Out of, was it three or five Walmart bags full, I found 2 nuts. So my father-in-law's idea, might of use to work, it's a bad idea for here.

We also are looking at (for here in the south) and hoping for some nice weather sometime in late Feb. to be able to plant some potatoes, onions, cabbage, turnips, and lettuce.

Yesterday, was a beautiful day here, so got in some outdoor work. Had about 3 dump trucks full of brush that I had cut back in Nov. and then it started raining the next day and didn't quit until the other day. So everything was dry and gave it a shot. Fire started right up and burnt the whole thing. Sherree was delighted that we got it burnt before Obama could impose a ban. I've got a huge pile of ashes out back this morning. Have heard, from my mother-in-law (don't know if I want to listen to them again) that it helps to put ashes around fruit trees. Anyone know anything about that?????
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby burien1 on Tue Jan 27, 2009 9:23 am

CaryC wrote:Hey,

Just a reminder to everyone that Feb. is the month to prune fruit, and nut trees. Also the time to prune those dogwoods.

I also went out and checked on those Black Walnuts we had gathered and then spread out by the fence, so they would self clean. Out of, was it three or five Walmart bags full, I found 2 nuts. So my father-in-law's idea, might of use to work, it's a bad idea for here.

We also are looking at (for here in the south) and hoping for some nice weather sometime in late Feb. to be able to plant some potatoes, onions, cabbage, turnips, and lettuce.

Yesterday, was a beautiful day here, so got in some outdoor work. Had about 3 dump trucks full of brush that I had cut back in Nov. and then it started raining the next day and didn't quit until the other day. So everything was dry and gave it a shot. Fire started right up and burnt the whole thing. Sherree was delighted that we got it burnt before Obama could impose a ban. I've got a huge pile of ashes out back this morning. Have heard, from my mother-in-law (don't know if I want to listen to them again) that it helps to put ashes around fruit trees. Anyone know anything about that?????


If I do any work outside today, it will be shoveling snow. :lol: I love it though ! :banana:

P.S. I knew those little varmits would gather any nuts left on the ground. :fightfish:
Last edited by burien1 on Fri Oct 16, 2009 8:53 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby Pretzelogical on Tue Jan 27, 2009 10:16 am

ashes around fruit trees


And blueberry bushes and strawberry fields (patches.) Getting the ash to stay there and not throw it up in the air when you mow is the trick.

Won't be pruining trees up here in the north for a few months yet! You're missing out on the four inches of snow that fell beautifully overnight!
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby daffodyllady on Tue Jan 27, 2009 11:33 am

And prune those grape vines.

Also, in those grape vine prunings, look for two-year-old reddish, healthy sections that are about 18 inches long. Stick the bottom 9 inches down into your garden, and cover the top with straw or hay. You can do a whole bundle of them together. Next spring, dig them up and carefully separate any roots that have begun to sprout. Plant them ten feet apart, and put up an arbor to support them.

A three-year-old Concord or Fredonia vine can give you 50 quarts of grape juice to put away!
And if you have grape vines to sell... in a depression, that would be a valuable commodity, I would think.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby CaryC on Tue Jan 27, 2009 2:57 pm

Hey,

Thanks for all the input. Our nursery people (we have people) told us to make a donut circle of mulch around our new fruit trees. I'm thinking put the ashes inside the donut. Would that be right?????

We don't have any grape vines.....ummmm might look into that, but we do have Muscadines around here that we are letting grow up in the trees.

It was supposed to be raining here today 70% chance. So far nothing but sunshine, and 60*s. So got out there and split (quartered) this big (really big) cedar tree. Am going to use it to rebuild the well shed in an old fashion way with a bucket and pulley. The next section of the cedar tree is also going to be quartered and used as a support for the roof of an 10' X 10' outdoor fire pit, with open sides. After I did that I went to the shop and ground the rust off of a cast iron pot belly stove, and then painted it. Mowed the front yard. All in about 3 hours. This has been the longest day.

Another story: Seems like I already posted this, but didn't see it anywhere, so will give it to you, maybe again.

Back in the old days, when people slaughtered the hog, they had to work all day to prepare the meat to preserve it. Butchered it, put it in the smoke house, cover it with salt etc.... Cook out cracklin's and lard and all that stuff in the same day. One other thing they did was to make up the sausage, and cook, and can it. So, when we got our deer meat back, some of it we had made into sausage, we thought we would try canning it the old fashion way.

The old fashion way was to fry it up (like you were going to eat it) put it in a jar (we kept ours in the oven at 250* for 30 mins.) and then pour the excess meat grease (we had to add 2 tablespoons of bacon grease, venison is very lean) into the jar, and then putting the seals on the jar and turning them upside down, and leaving them. The meat grease flows to the bottom and the lid seals in about 10 mins. We've had it made up for about 3 weeks now. An old timer came buy yesterday, and Sherree showed him our jar, he said it's been a long time since he's seen anything like that. We're like, I'm not sure if they will keep and are hesitant about eating them. But this guy said they will be good forever and not to worry about it. That that is the way they use to do it and have eaten dozens of jars of sausage kept that way. Just don't turn them back right side up, leave them upside down.

Have thought about making them up to sell. Any thoughts on that???? We have a Welcome Station about 18 miles from here and they let people put local made stuff up there for people to buy, who come from all over and stop by.

Have also been looking into or thinking about adding some solar panels to off set the electricity we use. This would be an "on grid" set up at first, anyway. Can one start small? Like one panel? Then add panels like one at a time ( man those things are expensive) Maybe, later going "off grid" and is it convertible???? Talk to me in real simple terms. I've looked at some solar sites and can't make heads or tails out of what they are saying.

Any help would be appreciated. And if you have a hankerin' to spit some logs, just PM me and I'll send direction to my house. :lol: Do you know how to run a tiller? That's coming up.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby GodsStudent on Tue Jan 27, 2009 6:39 pm

About Ashes in soil of fruit trees:

Not good for acid loving plants such as blueberries, but great for other fruit trees and grapes.

http://www.fruit-tree.com/blog/?p=15
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby tater on Tue Jan 27, 2009 6:57 pm

Recommend you do a soil test prior to ash application...ashes contain potassium which will form a lye when mixed with water...this lye will in turn, raise the pH of soils. If your soil is neutral or pH 7 or above you don't apply wood ash...and blueberries are an acid loving plant (soils 4.5 to 5.0) HTH
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby Pretzelogical on Tue Jan 27, 2009 7:18 pm

Well, I'm excited to see how great the blueberries will be this year without the ashes on them! WOW!
And thanks!
And sorry!

Oh, and more info on the canning of the sausage please: no liquid added, hunh, just meat and grease?
Do you really stuff the jar full?
What other meats can be done by sealing with grease?
How delicious does it look inside the jar?
The thought of a gal keeping a jar in the desk drawer at work tickles me. Co-workers standing around talking about where to go for lunch, and she opens a jar and starts eating those things. haha Little smokies with bbq sauce sealed with grease sounds appealing to me! Could that work?

Thanks again!
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby iamkk7ue on Tue Jan 27, 2009 7:46 pm

[quote="CaryC"]Hey,Thanks for all the input. Have also been looking into or thinking about adding some solar panels to off set the electricity we use. This would be an "on grid" set up at first, anyway. Can one start small? Like one panel? Then add panels like one at a time ( man those things are expensive) Maybe, later going "off grid" and is it convertible???? Talk to me in real simple terms. I've looked at some solar sites and can't make heads or tails out of what they are saying.
[quote]

My understanding of such a system would include the cells (more is good) themselves, batteries (yes, batteries) a unit to manage the charge logic properly and then a voltage inverter to run the plug in the wall junk. Low voltage lighting using led's is gaining popularity and becoming more economical. 12 volt appliances are not unheard of. The yield of zap per square whatever of solar panel material has gotten better over the years but it is still just a trickle of curret compared to what your range draws in just a minute of time.
There are compromises with this style of system. You can get way more bang using a solar oven to heat yer hot pocket than you will get electrically from a solar set up in the same amount of time. There are technical considerations that are quite daunting towards having an off the grid solar house that many dont consider initially. For example, batteries. Your batteries need a dry, temperate environment to remain viable. This would include the need for ventilation due to the hydrogen made during charging, a normal event. Batteries like cool in summer, warm in winter, with frequent maintenance. And batteries need to be away from the living quarters a bit as hydrogen is explosive. As you see, this usually opens a flood gate of other questions leading to still more. It can get rather involved and more than a bit spendy if you have someone else do the job for you.
These are the impressions I got in my study of doing something like this for the ole homestead here. If I had the budget and time to do this, would I do it? In a heartbeat you bet. Im thinking a little smaller might be managable. I only wish I had a little waterfall on my property...
I do however live in an area with cheap electricity, but its still no excuse to not be prepared. Alternative energy always has a capital outlay up front that I cant fund right now. So, at somepoint after the gas has ran out, there will be a freezer full of goodies for all. Help yourself!
:lol:
Hope that helps a little. Im open to discuss stuff like this whenever.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby Lightseeker on Tue Jan 27, 2009 7:53 pm

SueAnn wrote:I have a question about storing rice. Forgive me if this was already asked/answered. I do not have the time to go through this entire thread.

I bought my first big bag of rice. I don't know how many pounds it is, but it fits in a plastic grocery bag by itself and I can't easily lift it. I have never bought such a big bag before.

It is currently in a regular plastic bag. Not very sturdy. What is the best way to store it long term?
What kind of container and what kind of temperature, etc.
I plan on getting more in the future.


Hi SueAnn,

You might consider mixing in some Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth (fresh water source) as well. From what I understand, farmers mix it in with their grains all the time (and the best part is it's actually good for you - may be one of those natural God-given "medicines" :grin: ). Apparently the enemies of food storage are light, oxygen and bugs.

Blessings...
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby Cheryl on Tue Jan 27, 2009 9:27 pm

SueAnn wrote:I have a question about storing rice. Forgive me if this was already asked/answered. I do not have the time to go through this entire thread.

I bought my first big bag of rice. I don't know how many pounds it is, but it fits in a plastic grocery bag by itself and I can't easily lift it. I have never bought such a big bag before.

It is currently in a regular plastic bag. Not very sturdy. What is the best way to store it long term?
What kind of container and what kind of temperature, etc.
I plan on getting more in the future.


I do the mylar bag way mentioned above but if you are not storing enough to order some, it's not worth it .

I would go to a donut place and try to score a free 3-4 gallon bucket. They just toss them and usually will be happy to give you one. Next you can wash it good, then put in the rice with some dry ice. The dry ice will kill any pests. If you get a new lid, one with a rubber ring, and put it on tight, the dry ice will also pull out oxygen before it seals all the way. It'll last many years that way.

If that's even more than you hope to do, freeze it for a few days, stick it in the bucket with the lid it came with closed tight, and keep it in a cool, dark place. It'll still last quite awhile and if I'm reading this board correctly, most don't believe we'll need it to last for a couple decades.

Try cooking some before you put it away. It's very easy. Dry beans are as well. However, I would suggest you grab some canned foods when you can. People who are not used to cooking with the bare basics shouldn't be trying to learn it all during an emergency. Check your expiration date and you can simply rotate it out, putting new stuff in the back, bringing old cans forward for use that week.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby CaryC on Wed Jan 28, 2009 9:02 am

Hey,

Cheryl: You are so right about practicing with basic foods. It can be depressing learning in a depressed situation and that just adds to the dilemma. (Oooo, Sherree just let the cat in and it's sleeting out there) I would add one word of caution to your suggestions: When using dry ice leave the lid unsealed until all the dry ice evaporates. Then don't lift the lid just push it down secure on the pail/jar. The reason to leave the lid...cracked open is to allow the gases to escape. If you don't the gases will build up inside the pail and once the pressure exceeds the ability of the pail to contain it, it will explode.

Lightseeker: Could you give us a place online and maybe locally where we can get some Diatomaceous Earth. Like Ace or Walmart or something.

tater: thanks for the info on the ph, I think I've got a kit around here somewhere. Come to think of it they are near a pine tree, so instead of ashes I may need to apply lime. O and can use the ashes to make......soap. Course right now they are getting mixed with water (rain/sleet). Maybe all I need to do is stir and add fragrance. O honey where's the soap? Out in the yard dear, go get a shovel full will ya. :lol:

iamkk7ue: I was looking over at "Alternative Energy Store" http://home.altenergystore.com/ at an "on grid" system (didn't understand it all though) and was wondering if I could start small like with one panel (12 volts 135 watts, how big is that ? and what will it do for me, like run a cell phone charger, one light bulb, or a fridge?) for $650.00, and then what all else would I need. My understanding with an "on Grid" system is you won't need batteries, but will need, what an inverter? And then some way to feed it into the system without the system feeding into the panel. I don't even know if that makes any sense. And then as my finances allowed add panels to the system, I'm thinking plug and play type of thing. Does that sound like something that would happen on planet earth or is more of a Mars thing? Help! I'm a pretty handy handyman so am planning on doing it myself, with maybe some supervision from some friends.

Pretzelogical: Yea, we were wondering about doing like Venison Steaks in large mouth jars. Ok, let me back up a bit, with some history. Old days folks would slaughter their hogs, like I said before. The ladies would make up their sausage that same day, add sage, red pepper, black pepper to taste, to some ground hog meat, then they would fry one sausage to see if it tasted right. Once they got the mixture down right, then they would start cooking all the sausage they could, and cook it done. We wanted to try this method on some venison sausage to see if it would free up some space in the freezer.

This is what we did: We thawed out one sleeve of sausage, and since we didn't know how much it would make we got 3 jars ready. We put them in the oven at 250* for 30 minutes, before we used them, and left them in the oven as we would fry up the sausage. Started making the patties for biscuits size, and frying them done. As the patties got done we would put them in a jar. Turns out the sleeve made 20 patties which was just right for one quart jar. (we couldn't fry 20 patties at one time, so took a couple of fryings to get all of them) Like I said we knew we needed some meat grease in the end, and since there wasn't much coming out of the venison sausage we added 2 tablespoons of bacon drippings. Once all the sausage was fried we poured what grease was in the pan, into the jar. Sherree had heated the sealing lids in boiling water. Put the rings and seals on and turned it upside down. All the grease drained to the bottom, where the seal is, and in about 10 minutes it popped/sealed. Now the grease is about 3/8" thick on the bottom where the seal is and it has returned to it's hard mostly white color like lard. Even if the lid unseals, the meat won't spoil because the, now, lard is sealing it off. All you have to do is open them up and reheat them and they are ready to go. Of course you will have to eat all 20 of them in a day or so, once you open it.

As you can imagine it looks like there is air in the jar, this is what made us leary about the process, but since it sealed the air must be gone for it to create a vacuum and seal the jar, and all the old timers we spoke to said it wasn't a problem. Also remember these didn't keep forever, but were eaten from one season to the next, or even from one hog killing to the next.

As for doing other meats, I don't know, but would suggest giving it a try. One jar at a time. Let it set for a couple of months and then carefully try some. If anything doesn't look right, smell right, or taste right, throw it out. Sherree is telling me her sister watched some Amish folk canning chicken. Boiling the chickens in those big black kettles, stuffing them in jars and then pouring the broth in the jar and sealing it.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby CaryC on Thu Jan 29, 2009 9:48 am

Hey,

Just wanted to put up an update on this solar thing, just FYI:

Went here: http://www.xantrex.com/web/id/25/learn.asp trying to get my head wrapped around what all I needed to buy/do in regards to residential solar energy in conjunction with, what they are calling, "grid tie in". This is not a stand alone system, but something you can add to your home, to reduce your electricity bill.

For a "grid tie in", my understanding is, all you need are solar panels and an inverter. They have a diagram at the above site. Solar panels range from about $150.00 to $650.00 depending on wattage. The single phase (which is what your house uses) inverter starts at $1200.00.

To give some idea: We use roughly between 25 & 30 kwh a day, about 1000 kwh a month. The 135 watt solar panel is $650.00. If I'm not mistaken doesn't the k in kwh stand for kilo meaning "thousand"? If that is right, then we're using like 25,000 watts a day (roughly) and this one solar panel is only going to provide 135 watts. Seems like to make a big bang in the electricity bill we would need at least 10 of them--eventually. 10 X 135=13,500 watts. 650.00 X 10 = 6500.00 + 1200.00 inverter=$7700.00.

iamkk7ue help me out here, where am I going wrong?
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby Cheryl on Thu Jan 29, 2009 10:04 am

CaryC wrote:Hey,
When using dry ice leave the lid unsealed until all the dry ice evaporates. Then don't lift the lid just push it down secure on the pail/jar. The reason to leave the lid...cracked open is to allow the gases to escape. If you don't the gases will build up inside the pail and once the pressure exceeds the ability of the pail to contain it, it will explode.



You're correct. I haven't used that method myself so I've not completely researched it. I should use more caution when advising things I'm not as familiar with. Thanks for the correction.

Also, regarding the canning of meat, I have been reading on this (again, I haven't done it myself), but you need to use caution and perhaps look at some of the advice usually available at your county or state extension office. Trust me, the kind of "bad" meat can go can kill. I have some links around somewhere I'll try to post when I find them.

If I can find a used pressure canner I plan to can my own meat soon. I've heard it's wonderful because you just open the jar and it's already cooked. You can simply add it to anything you like. So, go for it, but use caution to do it correctly is all.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby Pretzelogical on Thu Jan 29, 2009 10:21 am

I fear the pressure canner! That is why I freeze instead of can beans. Would like to have a teacher come to my house, use my canner, and then they could cook dinner...

In my bad mood last week I was thinking of how for years people canned in ways the government does not recommend. It just seems like the government wants everyone to throw out perfectly good food.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby daffodyllady on Thu Jan 29, 2009 11:47 am

These days, we have "experts" telling us even how to breathe correctly.

Canning in any fashion that preserves the food from smelling bad, is ok and perfectly safe.... IF!

You boil it for 15 minutes after opening the jar, before tasting it.
This kills all botulism.

"They" say anymore not to use the open-kettle method of canning for low-acid foods, because it does not kill botulism spores, which can multiply in a perfectly sealed jar. You open it, taste it to see if it is good, and -BAM! you can die from it.

So, the experts tell us, do not do the three-hour open kettle method anymore for meats. Instead, you should only pressure-can all meats. But even after pressure canning, they tell us to not taste it before boiling it for 15 minutes.
:humm:

Seems to me, that if you are going to boil it for 15 minutes before tasting, then the 3-hour open kettle method would be okay!

But no, the experts, (who think we are too stupid to cook Walmart meat before eating- they have to label it with instructions to cook it first!) tell us all the hoops we must jump thru, before our home-canned food is fit to eat. Perhaps they really want us to feel overwhelmed and afraid of trying to do anything for ourselves. Including thinking.

I say, those who have a brain, should be entitled to the use of it.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby CaryC on Thu Jan 29, 2009 1:23 pm

Hey,

I have to admit that I'm not a cook, thank the Lord for Sherree, for more than just being an outstandingly good cook, but that too. If anything happens to Sherree, besides losing my mind, I would probably be running around in animal skins and eating my meat cooked on a spit, and making grunting sounds.

But from my point of view if it doesn't look bad, or smell bad, or have a bad/funny taste, and the lid is still sucked down, go for it. I can name you a bunch of folks who used the old fashion bath method, and died in their 90's, and canned meat too.

But hey, if you'd feel better off with a pressure canner, go for it. Lot's of folks use 'em.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby Lightseeker on Fri Jan 30, 2009 12:29 am

Hi Cary,

You asked where one could obtain diatomaceous earth (DE).

DE is often carried in feed stores and you may get it for a much better price there than online, especially once you factor in the shipping. It pays to check around. I checked three feed stores in the city I live in and the price varied from $8.99 to approx. $25 for 50 lb. of the identical product). It must be food grade and should be from a fresh water source.

Some will say it's important to get 100% DE but it probably depends on what you plan to do with it. Some may contain clay (ie. 65% DE and %35 clay) and that's not necessarily a bad thing and may even be a good thing. Again, from what I understand, it depends on the type of clay it contains. If it contains something like montmorillonite clay which is from the smectite "family" I believe (typing this in quickly without checking so don't quote me :grin: ) it's safe for human consumption and some would claim that it's good for you. It doesn't taste bad either, although perhaps a little gritty :mrgreen: .

Here are a couple of websites I came across (and no, I have no connection to them).

http://www.perma-guard.com/fossilshell.html
http://www.diatomitecanada.com/fossil-s ... -earth.htm

Hope that helps.

Blessings...
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby CaryC on Fri Jan 30, 2009 7:33 am

Hey Lightseeker,

Thanks for the info. I had no idea where to look for some. We've got several feed stores/co-ops around and about, so will check with them. Now I have another question: Any idea on how much to mix in....say a 5 lb bag of flour, or a gallon bag of rice? That may be at those sites, I'm sorry I hadn't looked at them.

Cheryl: Please don't think I was getting on to you, and most folks probably already knew that, but just in case I wanted to mention it. More in the way of reminder. You're doing OK and please keep the ideas coming.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby Cheryl on Fri Jan 30, 2009 10:04 am

daffodyllady wrote:These days, we have "experts" telling us even how to breathe correctly.

I say, those who have a brain, should be entitled to the use of it.


I can't say I disagree with the main point of your statement. However, my father worked in food safety for some time and one of the perks of modern day life expectancy comes partly from the experts who figured out common killers like water and food safety issues that often would pick off the weakest of us (children). I choose to take precautions and I thought I would mention it in case others are like me and prefer to go the extra step as well. I only suggested research. Sorry if I hit a touchy spot.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby daffodyllady on Fri Jan 30, 2009 11:43 am

I don't mean to sound touchy. Sorry there.
It just doesn't make sense to me, to tell people to never can meat using the open kettle method, but to always use the pressure canner, and then to boil it for 15 minutes after opening the jar.

The reason for never using the open-kettle method, is to guard against the lower temps that do not kill off the botulism spores. Pressure canners up the boiling temps, which kills the spores. But there is still a slim chance of a spore surviving... so they say to boil it as though you used the open kettle method? Why then, avoid the open-kettle method, if you are going to boil it afterwards anyhow? Why not just use either canning method, and always boil the stuff before tasting???

My mother had 9 children. She usually canned using the open kettle method. She always did low-acid foods for 3 hours. Granted, they usually turned to mush. But not one of us ever got sick from eating her home-canned food.

The most prevalent killers of children were these: birthing complications, communicable diseases, and the lack of antibiotics.

Not home-canned foods. Almost every family had a garden, and canned their green-beans, etc. Almost every home had a pantry, with canning shelves loaded at the beginning of winter, to see them through til next harvest.

If food poisoning from home-canned foods was so prevalent, there would be stories abounding of entire families dying at once. Because when botulism is served at dinner, it would affect the entire family. Granted, it has happened. But not very often.

Why do I feel so deeply about this? I am sitting here amazed at how intensely I am feeling. I think it is because I resent deeply the intrusion of so-called government experts into every area of our lives. And it will only get worse.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby iamkk7ue on Fri Jan 30, 2009 5:29 pm

CaryC wrote:Hey,

Just wanted to put up an update on this solar thing, just FYI:

Went here: http://www.xantrex.com/web/id/25/learn.asp trying to get my head wrapped around what all I needed to buy/do in regards to residential solar energy in conjunction with, what they are calling, "grid tie in". This is not a stand alone system, but something you can add to your home, to reduce your electricity bill.

For a "grid tie in", my understanding is, all you need are solar panels and an inverter. They have a diagram at the above site. Solar panels range from about $150.00 to $650.00 depending on wattage. The single phase (which is what your house uses) inverter starts at $1200.00.

To give some idea: We use roughly between 25 & 30 kwh a day, about 1000 kwh a month. The 135 watt solar panel is $650.00. If I'm not mistaken doesn't the k in kwh stand for kilo meaning "thousand"? If that is right, then we're using like 25,000 watts a day (roughly) and this one solar panel is only going to provide 135 watts. Seems like to make a big bang in the electricity bill we would need at least 10 of them--eventually. 10 X 135=13,500 watts. 650.00 X 10 = 6500.00 + 1200.00 inverter=$7700.00.

iamkk7ue help me out here, where am I going wrong?


You arent going wrong, you are correct. Thats where my statement of 'it can get spendy' comes from. The system would need whats called a 'transfer switch' to isolate the charging grid from the power company supply lines. Investigate equipment intended for backup generators to get the idea. My personal attempt at gridless power would lean towards having a charge source (solar or whatever; even an exercycle outfitted with a 12v alternator could work) linked to a massive bank of caterpillar sized diesel starting batteries. From them, a suitable voltage inverter would give the 110 ac for light appliances, 12v dc for the rest. Of course, the idea originated from a desire at the time to be able to run my ham gear for an extended period of time without the need for generators et al. Now I would like that and be able to run the freezer and fridge as well.

Of course, my offer is still good. When my gas generator runs out of fuel, you all are invited over for a feast. :mrgreen:
Its not about right and left, its about right and wrong. Thank you Christ Jesus! See ya real soon.....
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby CaryC on Sat Jan 31, 2009 8:10 am

Hey iamkk7ue,

Thanks bunches for the info. The above was my feeble attempt at figuring the cost. To go off grid would be around $20,000.00, for us, which is about half of what it was only about 9 months ago. A whole bunch of years ago, when sat. TV first came out, the little ones, not those monster dishes in peoples yards, I bought one for a thousand dollars and it came with instructions to install it yourself. Now they give the things away for signing up. And I've got 3 Directv service men who live within 5 miles of me. So am contemplating going that route this time. Just wait they will give them away, eventually.

O and thanks for the invite, but my question is do we have to wait or can we come on over now? :lol:

OOOpppps, I was reading over my above post and I miscalculated 135 X 10 isn't 13,500 but 1350 uuuu, so the cost for going off grid is still 40,000.00 for us.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby Lightseeker on Sat Feb 07, 2009 5:11 pm

Hi CaryC,

Sorry for taking so long to get back to you. Our internet access has been sporadic! With regards to the DE, the recommendations are that you not add more than 2% to your grains. Make sure you mix it in well and, if you're doing much of it, you might want to wear a dust mask! Good for you to ingest it but not so good for you to inhale it!

Blessings...
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby Looking4acity on Thu Feb 19, 2009 3:26 pm

Here are some things I'm doing to prepare:

We bought a wood burning stove yesterday and will have it ready to heat our home by next winter. By purchasing it now (late winter /early spring) we were able to save 15% on it.

We are starting to build a chicken coup and already have rabbits. We've also been buying extra food when it's on sale and plan to store wheat soon. Later, I plan to buy a couple of Nubian goats.

But the main reason I wanted to post is to tell about Essene Bread. Essene Bread is supposed to be the most healthful and easiest bread to make in the world. It requires a simple meat grinder (which I purchased shortly after deer hunting season at Wal-Mart for $15) and doesn't require yeast or oil! You sprout the wheat (hence the nutrition) and grind it into a paste, shape into a ball, then bake it. I understand that it is very good by itself, but even better when you add nuts, berries or even honey. You can find more recipes by doing a search. Here is a link to a simple one.

http://www.motherearthnews.com/Real-Foo ... Bread.aspx
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby CaryC on Sat Feb 21, 2009 7:35 am

Hey,

Thanks that sounds interesting.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby Phyllis on Tue Mar 03, 2009 9:38 am

I had not read this post until today, and have only skimmed it so far. What a wealth of information!

If this has been posted before, forgive me...

I just wanted to tell ya'll about my unusual way of BUILDING A FIRE. We heat with wood, and I am often the one building the fire. Several years ago, I stumbled across this method and have been using it flawlessly ever since. I actually tried it the first time to show myself that it WOULDN'T work, because I just knew it wouldn't. I was wrong!

Anyway, here is a easy way to build a fire, with nothing but wood, newspaper, and a match.
Lay your larger pieces of wood on the bottom of the stove. In my stove, I start out with wood about 5 or 6 inches across.
Lay 2 or 3 of them side by side with a little space in between. Now add smaller stuff on top of that, and end with kindling on top of that. A good handfull of broken sticks, twiggs, wooden shakes, lath,,,,whatever you have for kindling.
Now take about 3 full sheets of newspaper, and roll them up loosly, and tie them into knots. I know it sounds crazy, but this keeps them from unrolling as they burn, and helps keep them in place where your going to put them: right on the very top of your wood. Light with a match! The kindling will burn, droping down as it does, and catch the bigger stuff on fire.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby oldbeans316 on Mon Mar 09, 2009 12:38 pm

LOL

I just realised that mice or rats or something has found the copious amounts of popcorn I bought last September in preparation for the economic collapse. Not only had the mice completely emptied two bags of popcorn, but they had taken it and hidden it in other boxes in the basement.
Blessed are the merciful, for they shall be shown mercy.
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Re: Being Prepared

Postby proparent on Mon Mar 09, 2009 7:27 pm

Phyllis wrote:I had not read this post until today, and have only skimmed it so far. What a wealth of information!

If this has been posted before, forgive me...

I just wanted to tell ya'll about my unusual way of BUILDING A FIRE. We heat with wood, and I am often the one building the fire. Several years ago, I stumbled across this method and have been using it flawlessly ever since. I actually tried it the first time to show myself that it WOULDN'T work, because I just knew it wouldn't. I was wrong!

Anyway, here is a easy way to build a fire, with nothing but wood, newspaper, and a match.
Lay your larger pieces of wood on the bottom of the stove. In my stove, I start out with wood about 5 or 6 inches across.
Lay 2 or 3 of them side by side with a little space in between. Now add smaller stuff on top of that, and end with kindling on top of that. A good handfull of broken sticks, twiggs, wooden shakes, lath,,,,whatever you have for kindling.
Now take about 3 full sheets of newspaper, and roll them up loosly, and tie them into knots. I know it sounds crazy, but this keeps them from unrolling as they burn, and helps keep them in place where your going to put them: right on the very top of your wood. Light with a match! The kindling will burn, droping down as it does, and catch the bigger stuff on fire.





We heard about this method a month or two back, and also tried it in our wood stove. We did it the first time trying to prove that something like this couldn't possibly work! :lol:
To our amazement, it's worked perfectly everytime!
So now we do this method too.

Love, in Christ,
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